16 Comments

  1. Jeannine
    May 3, 2016 @ 5:21 am

    Xxx

    Reply

    • Gerda Saunders
      May 3, 2016 @ 5:05 pm

      Lovies back to you, my always supportive friend.

      Reply

  2. Gail Welman
    May 3, 2016 @ 1:41 pm

    Dear Gerda, your humour is amazing. My husband has Alzheimers and I struggle with the loss of my partner.

    Reply

    • Gerda Saunders
      May 3, 2016 @ 5:04 pm

      So sorry you are living through this disease with your husband. I think that a spouse’s dementia can often be harder on their partner than on themselves: while it is hard to feel myself going backwards, I can sometimes see from my husband’s expression that it is very, very hard for him too. He is the main booster of humor in our household! Thanks for being in touch and all the best with the wonderful care and love you are giving in such difficult circumstances. I admire you.

      Reply

  3. Lynne Butler
    May 3, 2016 @ 5:23 pm

    What an incredible site. The photos are stunning, the writing amazing. What you are doing for the world with your gifts (both of you) is so valuable. Thank you.

    Reply

    • Gerda Saunders
      May 3, 2016 @ 5:29 pm

      Dearest Lynne, you have such a gift of observing things in my life and through your beautiful words making them seem much better than they probably are in real life. Love you, dearest friend.

      Reply

  4. Sherri Vance
    May 4, 2016 @ 6:24 am

    The website is beautiful. Thank you for sharing this blog–the insights, the gorgeous writing.

    Reply

    • Gerda Saunders
      May 4, 2016 @ 7:39 am

      Dear, dear Sherri, Your response means so much to me, as does our long recognition of shared soulness in each other.

      Reply

  5. Peter
    May 5, 2016 @ 11:33 am

    My dearest angel, so here you give expression to your daily frustrations that I see all the time. Your wringing of hands, your impatience with yourself and your stuggle with activities every day tear at my soul. But we have so much fun together and your memory loss is a great excuse for me when I forget to tell you something … “But remember I told you yesterday that …”. I hear you calling for me to help you find the blog page which you have forgotten and I am on my way.

    Reply

    • Gerda Saunders
      May 5, 2016 @ 2:07 pm

      My dearest love, your comment means so much to me, I’m going to write a new post about it. Watch this spot for it–soon, I hope. Love you. Where are the emoticons when I need them!

      Reply

  6. Elza Koen
    May 5, 2016 @ 11:48 pm

    Dear Gerda, your writing is amazing! You make the realities of growing older so precious and real. Eventually we all start ‘dementing’, whether physically, mentally, diagnosed as some specific condition, or just normally aging and it is hard to live with the realities of getting older. Did all our parents find it so hard,or did they not talk about it, or were we not aware enough to listen ?
    Fond love.

    Reply

    • Gerda Saunders
      May 9, 2016 @ 10:08 am

      Dearest Elza, Thanks so much for your kind and encouraging words. Yes, no one escapes old age–the only alternative is dying young, and who wants to miss a single day of life while it is still overwhelmingly beautiful? I often think of our parents and grandparents. I did see my mother often having a very hard tiime with her dementia, but she nevertheless remained extremely loving and always lit up when I saw her. Since so much of my life with her was after we emigrated, her voice when she answered the phone is one of my most precious memories: when I told her it was me, her whole voice beamed delight and surprise, as if i had just stepped into her room. I did not, of course, appreciate even a splinter of the cross she was carrying. I’m afraid that’s the way life goes–our parents give to us, and we give to our kids, who will also “get it” only when they give to their children in turn. Thanks, as always, for your insightprovoking thoughts. Love you lots and lots.

      Reply

  7. Vicki Nash Sutherland
    May 6, 2016 @ 9:35 am

    So enjoy reading about you but wish so much you didn’t have to go through it all. Thank you so much for sharing your experiences and I wish you all the very best. Often think of you and Peter and the fun times we had together.

    Reply

    • Gerda Saunders
      May 9, 2016 @ 10:02 am

      Dear Vicki, thanks so much for your wonderful support and decades of friendship–your are right about the fun times we’ve had. I remember so many dinners at your house and laughter with your family. I am grateful that I am still able to share my experiences. Your thoughts and good wishes mean so much to you. I wish you and yours all the best you imagine for yourselves. Lots of love.

      Reply

  8. Cliff Saunders
    May 8, 2016 @ 10:01 am

    Dear Gerda, this is such a wonderful thing you are doing for those suffering from Dementia and those who will be heading that way. Also for those who care for them. As you and Peter’s South African family we have experienced your incredibly fine qualities which we hope and pray will endure for a long time yet. We will always love you, Peter and your wonderful family who have meant so much to us and many other people.
    Please remember that! Cliff and Ria

    ‘Ek sien haar wen!’ Our Afrikaans High School’s Motto which means ‘ I see her winning’

    Reply

  9. Gerda Saunders
    May 9, 2016 @ 9:38 am

    Dearest Cliff and Ria, your support is, as always, such a “riem onder my hart.” Thanks for your kind and loving words and good wishes. I so appreciate your expression of your love for me and our family–if there are two people in the world whose love I don’t doubt, it is you and Cliff. You show love to us and other people every day of your lives. Dankie ook vir die Affie leuse: it describes you too, as well as my classmates with whom I was reunited last year. Love you lots and lots.

    Reply

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